Microsoft Rebrands adCenter to Bing Ads

Bing AdsThis week, Microsoft announced a complete rebrand of their Pay Per Click advertising program Microsoft adCenter, renaming it Bing Ads.

The rebrand comes with a few new features and the retirement of some existing features. Bing Ads features a new web interface, improved ad rotation controls, and agency tools that make it easier for agencies to manage multiple accounts, similar to the My Client Center offered by Google AdWords.

As part of the rollout, the Microsoft Network has been renamed the Yahoo! Bing Network. Some of the new features include Editorial Exceptions and the Exceptions API, which allows advertisers better control over requesting exceptions to resolve editorial disapprovals more quickly.

If you’re an existing Microsoft adCenter customer, you don’t need to do anything – your interface has automatically been updated. If you are new to Bing Ads, you can sign up here.

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Free AdWords Credit Vouchers for Search Engine College Students

Hey everyone

We were accepted into the Google Engage for Agencies program last month and as part of that status, we are now able to distribute vouchers for AdWords credit to all our Search Engine College students.

If you are a current or past student of Search Engine College and you would like to receive a Google AdWords credit voucher to the value of USD 75 – please contact me either via the in-course message system, or via our online Contact Form quoting your name, your student number and/or the date you signed up as a student.

There is a catch though – vouchers are only redeemable for new AdWords accounts or accounts that are less than 14 days old. If you are a PPC student, the voucher can be applied during the AdWords account set up process that you go through as part of your lesson material.

If you are not yet a Search Engine College student, never fear – sign up and you will be issued with a voucher at some point soon after your enrollment.

Happy spending!

 

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Match Types to Change in Google AdWords

When I first heard this news, I was incensed. Now I know that advertisers can opt-out of the changes, I am a little calmer, but still pissed.

Here’s the deal: Starting next month, Google is changing the way match types work in AdWords. From mid May onwards, misspellings, plurals and variations of your Exact Match and Phrase Match keywords on Google AdWords will trigger your ads. In the past, if you wanted your ad to appear for variations, abbreviations or misspellings, you would use Broad Match targeting. If you wanted your ad to appear for plurals or word stemming, you would use “Phrase Match” targeting. If you wanted your ad to appear only when searchers typed in a specific phrase/keyword, you used [Exact Match]. Now, by default, using Exact Match or Phrase Match targeting will ALSO trigger your ads for each of the described variations.

Despite Google calling this change *an improvement*, for all intents and purposes, this means Exact Match is dead. Yes, advertisers can opt-out of this so-called feature, but it is switched on by default, which means that new advertisers selecting Exact Match as a match type will wrongly assume their ads will only be triggered by exact matches of their keywords. It’s a pretty logical assumption! I don’t know about you, but I think that Exact Match should remain, you know, an EXACT MATCH. At the very least, they should change the match type to IN-exact Match so it is less misleading.

According to Search Engine Land, Google has already been testing the new functionality with advertisers and claims the change has resulted in a 3 percent rise in clicks, at comparable CPCs. In the same sentence, Google states that individual results will vary. No freaking kidding. Variations can account for a LOT of searches and for advertisers on a tight budget, this could spell disaster. Here’s an example: if you are an artist selling color prints of your artwork and targeting [color prints] as an exact or phrase match, would you want your ad to be triggered if someone types in *color printers*? No. But it seems this is a distinct possibility under the new rules.

With this move, it feels like Google is taking away some of the minimal control advertisers have over how/when their ads appear in their increasingly annoying quest to make more money for shareholders. I say hands off our Exact Match Google!

What do you think? Do you feel like the changes are reducing the control you have over your campaigns? Please add to the discussion in the comments.

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Q and A: Where can I learn how to use all the features of Microsoft adCenter?

QuestionHi Kalena

I’ve been using Google AdWords for years and feel quite confident with the program, however it has literally taken me years to learn all the features and how to tweak things for better results and more conversions. I’ve just started using Microsoft adCenter recently and I’m finding it hard going. There just seem to be so many features I’m unfamiliar with and even getting my head around the interface is a struggle after so many years of AdWords exposure.

Do you offer a course at Search Engine College that is solely dedicated to MS adCenter?

Thanks

Sophie

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Hi Sophie

We offer two courses in Pay Per Click Marketing – a PPC Starter course and a PPC Advanced course, however while both courses do have lessons dedicated to MS adCenter, the bulk of the lessons cover all aspects of PPC marketing. If you’re looking for something more granular in terms of using MS adCenter, you should check out their adCenter Training Center which contains around 35 training videos designed to teach you all aspects of using adCenter. You can even sign up to take the Accredited Professional Exam when you’re finished.

In case you’re not already aware, Google also offers similar video training for AdWords plus detailed lesson modules via the AdWords Learning Center.

Kalena

 

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Article: Making Sense of Trademarks in AdWords

The issue of trademark usage in Google AdWords ad text and keyword bidding was raised on this blog recently thanks to a question submitted by Dom.

As I discovered when I resarched the topic for Dom, AdWords trademark usage rules are different for advertisers in different countries and they differ also based on the use of trademarks in ad text and bid keywords. The subject proved so complex that I decided to write an article about it in order to clarify the issue for confused advertisers.

Coincidently, a landmark case about this very issue was playing out here in Australia while I was writing the article and the Federal court made their decision just in time for me to add the outcome to the article.

The article is called Making Sense of Trademarks in AdWords and was published today by SiteProNews.

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