Well done, Search Engine College graduates!

I’d like to express hearty congratulations to our latest graduates on behalf of staff and tutors at Search Engine College.

All students named below have successfully completed a course at Search Engine College and attained official certification status (requiring a passing grade of 70 percent or higher.)

Search Engine Optimization 101

  • Jonathan Tressler
  • Louise Marshall
  • Christy Hicks
  • Debbie Moore
  • Jessica Kennedy
  • Michelle Macken
  • Liang Wang
  • Dorothee Balas
  • Suzanne Robinson
  • Paul Havey
  • Deborah Neighbors
  • Ajay Nair
  • Donna Pineau
  • Dino Basaldella
  • Rob Whyte
  • Amy Brockman
  • Kindra Cotton
  • Puja Dakhera
  • Michonne Rose Proulx
  • Terry Del Percio
  • Sarah Harlock
  • Robert Rivera
  • Darlene Sojka
  • Carmen Rivera
  • Louie Zanoni
  • William Smith
  • Nicholas Fokianos
  • Steve Ollington
  • Jacky Hill
  • Fredrick Johnston


Search Engine Optimization 201

  • Debbie Moore
  • Jacqueline Christian
  • Christy Hicks
  • Suzanne Robinson
  • Paul Havey
  • Ann Merrill
  • Deborah Neighbors
  • Jonathan Tressler
  • Dino Basaldella
  • Jessica Kennedy
  • Amy Brockman
  • Kindra Cotton
  • Puja Dakhera
  • Brandon Bergmann
  • Robert Rivera
  • Carmen Rivera
  • Nicholas Fokianos
  • Steve Ollington
  • Ajay Nair
  • Joseph Santia
  • Rachel Haber
  • Lewis Husbands


Pay Per Click Advertising 101

  • Debbie Moore
  • Rebekah Pettigrew
  • Bryna Davidow
  • Deborah Neighbors
  • Amy Brockman
  • Brandon Bergmann
  • Jessica Kennedy
  • Nicholas Fokianos
  • Yvonne Brandon
  • Jacqueline Christian
  • Ajay Nair


Pay Per Click Advertising 201

  • Debbie Moore
  • Bryna Davidow
  • Deborah Neighbors
  • Matthew McGee
  • Amy Brockman
  • Puja Dakhera
  • Yvonne Brandon
  • Linda Le
  • Brandon Bergmann
  • Jacqueline Christian
  • Shane Cummiskey


Web Site Copywriting 101

  • Rebekah Pettigrew
  • Ann Merrill
  • Leann Phoenix
  • Shane Cummiskey
  • Birgitt Olsen
  • Robert Garvie


Web Site Usability 101

  • John Rodrigues
  • Christy Hicks
  • Karen Numoto
  • Debbie Moore
  • Matthew McGee
  • Bev Asllanaj
  • Maha El Refai
  • Michonne Rose Proulx


Link Building 101

  • Deborah Neighbors
  • Robert Rivera


Article Marketing & Distribution 101

  • Dave Lobo


Copywriting for PPC 101

  • Bryna Davidow
  • Amy Brockman


Certified Search Engine Optimizer

  • Ann Merrill
  • Christy Hicks
  • Puja Dakhera
  • Bev Asllanaj
  • Robert Rivera
  • Jessica Kennedy


Certified Pay-Per-Click Marketer

  • Matthew McGee


Certified Search Engine Marketer

  • Deborah Neighbors
  • Bryna Davidow
  • Debbie Moore
  • Amy Brockman
  • Leann Phoenix
  • Brandon Bergmann
  • Shane Cummiskey
  • John Cullen

Congratulations everyone! Please contact your tutor if you are still waiting to receive your hard copy certificate, Status Page or certification seal.

Also, don’t forget to fan of our Facebook page and follow our Twitter profile @secollege for College announcements such as lesson updates, press releases, new courses, events and milestones.

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Q and A: How can I attract more inbound links to my site?

QuestionDear Kalena,

We have a plant seller nursery website that contains mostly product and contact information etc. How can I attract more links to my site?

Thanks in advance,
Trish

Dear Trish,

In order for your site to be considered ‘linkworthy’ you need to build some good-quality, industry-specific content that people in your niche market will find useful. If your site is purely product-based there are fewer reasons for other sites to link to your site.

Building links is all about obtaining online referrals. A good link building strategy considers internet users and website owners. The ultimate aim is to obtain more referrals for your site from other website owners and ultimately to get more customers to your site.

Think about the people that view your website (in your case plant growers and gardening enthusiasts) what would they find useful? What would make them want to revisit your site? A searchable database containing photographs and general information about the plants that you sell would be an appealing addition. Or an article library/blog – filled with gardening ideas, advice and resources could keep your customers coming back to your site again and again.

When it comes to attracting inbound links, content is king. If your site contains good-quality, industry-specific information, people will come to your website not only to buy things, but to find information. Also other websites may refer to information contained on your site in order to be associated with your quality content. In this way you will develop an authoritive presence within your industry that will attract good quality inbound links over time.

Sarah Parker
Parker Communications

Search Industry Job of the Week

Job Title: Virtual Marketing Internships
Job Reference #: Unknown
Position Type: part time, unpaid with benefits
Name of employer: Reinventing Life  Enterprises
Location: virtual
Date Posted: 9 September 2011
Position description:

Two Part-Time Virtual Marketing Internships Available – Applicants can live anywhere and will work with the Reinventing Life Enterprises international virtual team from your home office.

Reinventing Life Enterprises has two part-time marketing internships open.

RL Enterprises is a small women owned and operated international firm offering all employees personal life flexibility within an upbeat virtual office environment.  Work together with them from the comforts of your own home office. 

The two successful applicants will work together and with the rest of the international virtual team to continue ongoing social media and article marketing while designing and implementing new marketing strategies. 

This is a great way to build your CV or resume with real experience, and their previous intern (reference available) found work as a result of the real work skills developed with them. Work hours are flexible and communication, tracking outputs, are primarily at the time of the candidates choosing.

While this is an unpaid position at this time, it is offered with the intention that for the right applicant it will mature into part-time employment.

Tasks and Responsibilities include:

  • Social network marketing for three websites.
  • Spinning content, and managing article marketing campaign.
  • Building backlinks relationships with other sites.
  • Participating in Search Engine -Optimization (SEO) research and decision making.
  • Development of newsletter and video marketing strategies.
  • Web research on a variety of topics to develop into web content.

Qualities Desired:

  • Interest in/knowledge of marketing – especially internet marketing through the use of social media, article marketing, shared links and advertising etc.
  • Interest in/knowledge of SEO, website analytics, web advertising etc.
  • Proficient in Excel/word or Open office equivalents.
  • Ability to (or interest in learning how to) analyze marketing data and present to the team in a simple clear way – along with presentation of suggestions for future action.
  • Interest in involvement in building a web presence for innovative startup internet businesses.
  • Flexible.
  • Comfortable with web meetings/skyping and other forms of internet communication.
  • Ability to work independently without constant supervision.
  • Desire to work as part of an international team working toward growth of the organization.
  • Attention to detail.
  • Comfortable sharing ideas, suggestions and being a full contributing member of a team.

NOTE: While this is an unpaid position, all expenses are paid and active team members do accrue benefits such as availability for holiday home in Kinsale for no cost, etc.

The three websites you will be developing marketing strategies for are:
www.reinventinglife.org
www.futureofeducationproject.net
www.doctoralnet.com

Interested Applicants Should Email Their CV’s to: Dr. E. Alana James:    alana@ealanajames.com

Salary range: Unpaid to begin with.
Closing date: Unknown
Contact: Send resumes to: alana@ealanajames.com

For more search industry job vacancies, or to post a position, visit: Search Engine College Jobs Board.

Q and A: Can competitors use my company name in their AdWords ads?

QuestionHi Kalena

I have a question. I talked to my Google rep who once said that putting my company’s name in an ad violates Google’s terms. However, in another post on here, you seem to suggest bidding on a brand name is also a violation is that correct? I was under the assumption that was common practice. Is it not? If I could report that to Google, that is important information.

Dom

Hi Dom

I’m not sure if you are referring to your own ads or those created by your competitors, but putting your own company name in your ad is certainly not a violation, it’s encouraged, particularly if yours is a well known brand/name. If you follow this link about Use of Trademarks in AdWords, you’ll find an authorization form you can submit to be able to use your brand / trademark throughout your account.

Now use of your trademark by competitors is where things get complicated. It differs between region and differs again between ad text versus keyword bids. Google actually opened up trademark keyword bidding two years ago, however AdWord’s trademark policy is now dependent on the region your trademark is registered in and the region/s your billing account is located in. So here are the main regional trademark policies:

  1. In certain regions, Google allow some ads to show with a trademark in ad text if the ad is from a reseller or from an informational site. There is a separate trademark policy for resellers and informational sites.
  2. For regions that are NOT included under Google’s trademark policy for resellers and informational sites, if their investigation finds that the advertiser is using the trademark in ad text, Google will require the advertiser to remove the trademark and prevent them from using it in ad text in the future.
  3. In most regions covered by the Trademark policy (including UK, USA and Canada), Google will investigate ad text only. They will not disable keywords in response to a trademark complaint in these regions. Furthermore, their investigation will only affect ads served on or by Google rather than those served on partner sites.
  4. In EU and EFTA regions, Google does not prevent the selection of trademarks as keywords. However, in response to a complaint, they will do a limited investigation as to whether a keyword (in combination with particular ad text) is confusing as to the origin of the advertised goods and services.
  5. In some limited regions, Google may investigate the use of trademarks in ad text, in keywords, or in both ad text and keywords. These regions include: Australia / Brazil / China / Hong Kong / Macau / New Zealand / North Korea / South Korea / Taiwan

Because Australia and New Zealand are included in the above list (and these are the countries in which I operate), I have witnessed a few keyword trademark infringements and represented some clients who lodged complaints procedures based on this policy.

So the short answer is, unless they have your explicit permission, your competitors generally aren’t allowed to use your brand/name in their own ads, but if you’re located outside the limited regions mentioned above, they ARE allowed to bid on your brand/name as a keyword. But it’s not all bad news – it means that you are allowed to bid on their brand/name as well.

Hope this clarifies things!

Kalena

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Q and A: Which is more important, the number of clicks on each ad or the CTR of each ad?

QuestionHi Kalena

I have some questions about Google Adwords campaigns.

When evaluating ad performance in a Google Adwords campaign, which is more important: The actual number of clicks on each ad or the Click Through Rate (CTR) of each ad?

What is “% Served” and should we be paying attention to the “% Served” of our ads?

Finally, I read in the PPC101 reading material about Google’s “Average Position” but I’m a bit confused by this because the ads running in my campaign that have the lowest Average Position are not the ads that are performing the best. In fact, there seems to be no correlation between the ads that are performing best and their Average Position. The ads that are performing the best are not the ones with the lowest Average position. I don’t understand how to utilize this “Average position” if it’s not indicating how the ads are performing. So, I guess the question is: How should we utilize an ad’s “Average position” in the grand scheme of things?

Thank you,

Wendy

Hi Wendy

To answer your questions briefly:

1) The CTR and conversion rate are always the figures you should be looking at when it comes to measuring the effectiveness of your ads. So ads that attract more clicks will have a high CTR, but this doesn’t mean much unless the clicks end up converting to customers / sign ups.

2) % served shows the rate each ad is served compared to other ads. So if one ad has 70% served against it, that means 70% of the time one of your ads is shown, it’s this one. The other ads make up the remaining 30% of ad displays. Google only show the best performing ads over time, so they will gradually phase out ads that don’t attract many clicks in favor of the ones with a higher CTR. That’s why the percentages seem much higher for some ads.

3) Average position relates to your ad position within the search results. So if your bid is high enough, your ad will appear in a higher average position. Ads that don’t perform well or don’t have a high enough bid rate on their trigger keywords will show in a lower average position. You don’t control this particular metric – it is controlled by your ad positions as determined by Google.

Hope this helps!

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